Fancies and Interludes

with Jacques Israelievitch, violin

2015
Lyrical, jazzy, complex… 20th century works by established Canadian composers and one closely associated with Canada receive compelling performances in this new Centrediscs recording by a duo of two of Canada’s finest soloists. It’s a collection of contrasts – from the lyrical, contemporary classicism of Oskar Morawetz’s Duo to the quirky, minimalist jazziness of James Rolfe’s Drop; and juxtaposing primal rhythms and tonal colours of Raymond Luedeke’s monumental Fancies and Interludes VI. Gary Kulesha’s seductive and passionate ...and dark time flowed by her like a river... also features complex rhythmic structures, along with virtuoso parts for both instruments.

The Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s concertmaster for a record-setting 20 years, Jacques Israelievitch has also appeared as soloist with many major orchestras and conductors, and performed chamber music with Emanuel Ax, Yefim Bronfman, and Yo-Yo Ma. He is violinist for the New Arts Trio. A day-long performance and subsequent recording of Mozart sonatas is part of his duo collaboration with pianist Christina Petrowska Quilico. As a conductor, he has been music director of the Koffler Chamber Orchestra since 2005. In his discography of more than 100 albums are the first complete recording of Kreutzer’s 42 Studies, and concertos, including ones he has premiered. He is an officer of France’s Order of Arts and Letters, and holds a Lifetime Achievement Award for his distinguished contribution to the performing arts in Canada.

1. Duo for Violin & Piano 8:33 (OSKAR MORAWETZ)
2. Drop 9:32 (JAMES ROLFE)
3. ...and dark time flowed by her like a river... 11:23 (GARY KULESHA)
4. Fancies and Interludes VI 39:37 (RAYMOND LUEDEKE)

Recorded live at the Tribute Communities Recital Hall,
York University. / Enregistré en direct au Tribute Communities Recital
Hall, à l’ Université York.

An Astounding Level of Virtuosity
Fancies and Interludes is a recording of works for violin and piano written by four eminent Canadian composers and performed by the late Jacques Israelievitch, violin, and Christina Petrowska Quilico, piano. Israelievitch had a distinguished career as a concertmaster, soloist, chamber musician, teacher, and conductor. Christina Petrowska Quilico is an award-winning pianist and professor at York University. In this CD we hear an astounding level of virtuosity. Both performers also deliver eloquent interpretations filled with individuality and rich expression.

Quilico, is a world-class performer and we enjoy her virtuoso technique and classy presentation throughout.
Born in Ottawa, James Rolfe is one of Canada’s leading classical composers. Drop was composed in 1998 and premiered in Toronto in 1999. In this piece minimalist techniques are employed with rhythmical patterns that escalate and spiral from the opening passages. The piano doubles the violin melody in the memorable middle section; the synchronization of the instruments in unison is admirable. Drop has a special authenticity which creates an atmosphere that fascinates the listener. I applaud the interpretation and superb technical execution of both performers.

Gary Kulesha’s mysterious and beautiful composition, ...and dark times flowed by her like a river, was written in 1993; the title is taken from a novel by Thomas Wolfe. As a violinist, I was fascinated by the diverse violin techniques and musical language that Kulesha uses, which make the piece very appealing. I can feel the excitement of the musicians and how deeply the piece affects them by the way they transcend the musical execution. The sound is rich and resonates with remarkable impact. There is a variety of nuance, colour, and character infused into the piece that is delivered through the intelligent interpretation of both performers. This is a perfect example where the essence of the composition moves the musicians and the listener.

Raymond Luedeke’s piece, Fancies and Interludes VI, was written for Israelievitch. A virtuoso display piece for violin and piano, it is almost forty minutes long and at times is repetitive. The interludes are played pizzicato by the pianist plucking the strings inside the instrument. Each of the interludes consists of between two and five notes that bring the listener to a quiet point before the new material is introduced. Throughout the composition the dominating percussive rhythms of the piano are in contrast to the violin, which often has lyrical melodies or shimmering chains of notes in fast rhythm. In all of the fancies we hear layers of diverse rhythm that sound increasingly agitated at places. The development of each fancy episode, as well as the transitional interludes, is essential for the form of the piece. The violin enters in the last interlude and finishes with a cadence that concludes the piece. Jacques Israelievitch and Christina Petrowska Quilco deliver a performance of excellent musicality.

The music of this CD will challenge many listeners, but the performers are presented in a most favourable light. I recommend this recording to listeners who enjoy contemporary classical music. The program notes are quite thorough and the sound quality is exceptional.Fancies and Interludes is a recording of works for violin and piano written by four eminent Canadian composers and performed by the late Jacques Israelievitch, violin, and Christina Petrowska Quilico, piano. Israelievitch had a distinguished career as a concertmaster, soloist, chamber musician, teacher, and conductor. Christina Petrowska Quilico is an award-winning pianist and professor at York University. In this CD we hear an astounding level of virtuosity. Both performers also deliver eloquent interpretations filled with individuality and rich expression.

Quilico, is a world-class performer and we enjoy her virtuoso technique and classy presentation throughout.
Born in Ottawa, James Rolfe is one of Canada’s leading classical composers. Drop was composed in 1998 and premiered in Toronto in 1999. In this piece minimalist techniques are employed with rhythmical patterns that escalate and spiral from the opening passages. The piano doubles the violin melody in the memorable middle section; the synchronization of the instruments in unison is admirable. Drop has a special authenticity which creates an atmosphere that fascinates the listener. I applaud the interpretation and superb technical execution of both performers.

Gary Kulesha’s mysterious and beautiful composition, ...and dark times flowed by her like a river, was written in 1993; the title is taken from a novel by Thomas Wolfe. As a violinist, I was fascinated by the diverse violin techniques and musical language that Kulesha uses, which make the piece very appealing. I can feel the excitement of the musicians and how deeply the piece affects them by the way they transcend the musical execution. The sound is rich and resonates with remarkable impact. There is a variety of nuance, colour, and character infused into the piece that is delivered through the intelligent interpretation of both performers. This is a perfect example where the essence of the composition moves the musicians and the listener.

Raymond Luedeke’s piece, Fancies and Interludes VI, was written for Israelievitch. A virtuoso display piece for violin and piano, it is almost forty minutes long and at times is repetitive. The interludes are played pizzicato by the pianist plucking the strings inside the instrument. Each of the interludes consists of between two and five notes that bring the listener to a quiet point before the new material is introduced. Throughout the composition the dominating percussive rhythms of the piano are in contrast to the violin, which often has lyrical melodies or shimmering chains of notes in fast rhythm. In all of the fancies we hear layers of diverse rhythm that sound increasingly agitated at places. The development of each fancy episode, as well as the transitional interludes, is essential for the form of the piece. The violin enters in the last interlude and finishes with a cadence that concludes the piece. Jacques Israelievitch and Christina Petrowska Quilco deliver a performance of excellent musicality.

The music of this CD will challenge many listeners, but the performers are presented in a most favourable light. I recommend this recording to listeners who enjoy contemporary classical music. The program notes are quite thorough and the sound quality is exceptional.

- Ralitsa Tcholakova, Ottawa: CAML/ACBM (http://caml-acbm.org/)
to download a PDF version of this article, click here.
Modern and Contemporary
Fancies and Interludes is both a labour of love and musical declaration, intuited and played by two ingenious and accomplished musicians – former Toronto Symphony concertmaster Jacques Israelievitch and pianist Christina Petrowska Quilico. Recorded live at York University’s Tribute Communities Recital Hall, it has the immediacy and the vigour of a live performance (background sounds of pages being turned included), which makes the music come alive with the splendour of the excitement (or the sorrow) of each precious phrase as it was played in the moment.

Fancies and Interludes includes four duos for violin and piano by contemporary Canadian composers. The title track belongs to the last piece on the album, the lengthy and rich Fancies and Interludes VI by Raymond Luedeke, a prolific composer and former TSO clarinetist who wrote this composition especially for Jacques Israelievitch. Five Fancies are framed by Six Interludes, starting as a somewhat fragmented conversation between two vastly different voices and resolving in a harmonious ending.

On the other hand, the album opens with the strong momentum of Oskar Morawetz’s Duo for violin and piano. This piece grabs the listener right away, taking them on the journey from the rhythmical flow of the beginning to the deep lament in a Phrygian D-minor in the last section. Nestled in between are Drop by James Rolfe, my personal favourite on this recording, a fascinating musical travel from earth to heaven and back, and ...and dark time flowed by her like a river, by another composer with a TSO connection, composer-adviser Gary Kulesha. The work is a play between tonal and atonal, reflecting a search for the meaning of a moment in time.

The programming on this CD is exquisite – the compositions flow one after another as if they were meant to be. Israelievitch and Petrowska Quilico allow the impulse, the urge to soar and expand in their playing while granting the listener a breathing space – the true embodiment of Fancies and Interludes.

Editor’s Note: Jacques Israelievitch, who enjoyed an international career as a soloist, conductor and teacher, died September 5. He was 67 years old. He was diagnosed with aggressive, metastatic lung cancer in late February this year. Israelievitch had the distinction of being the longest-serving concertmaster of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Retiring in 2008 after 20 years, he joined the faculty of York University’s School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design, as professor of violin and viola. On August 14, in a special ceremony at his home, Israelievitch was presented with the Order of Canada, one of this country’s highest civilian orders, recognizing outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation for nearly three decades. Although Fancies and Interludes was the last CD released during his lifetime, Isrealievitch and Christina Petrowska Quilico completed recording Mozart’s 28 violin sonatas last May. The CDs will be released in 2016.

- Ivana Popovic, The Whole Note (www.thewholenote.com)
see the article online here.
Écoute intégrale
Israelievitch et Quilico : découvrez deux explorateurs musicaux canadiens
Ce disque s’adresse aux plus curieux, à ceux qui, comme les deux interprètes ici réunis, aiment explorer tous les terrains sonores, tant classiques que contemporains.

Ça vous intrigue?

Première étape : faire connaissance avec ces deux grandes figures de la vie musicale canadienne.

1) Le violoniste, Jacques Israelievitch, violon solo du Toronto Symphony Orchestra pendant 20 ans, ardent défenseur des compositeurs d’aujourd’hui.

2) La pianiste, Christina Petrowska Quilico qui, jusqu’à maintenant, a créé plus de 150 œuvres nouvelles (entrevue en anglais).

Ce qui les unit, vous l’aurez compris, c’est leur goût de l’aventure, l’idée d’explorer, de découvrir, de sortir de sa zone de confort, de se laisser surprendre et de faire vivre la musique de compositeurs qu’ils ont eu la chance de connaître.

Deuxième étape : plonger dans l’aventure, l’esprit ouvert.

Voici votre chance de nourrir votre goût de l’inouï, de vous laisser déstabiliser et de découvrir quatre œuvres de quatre compositeurs canadiens. À chacun son style!

Oskar Morawetz (1917-2007) flirte encore avec le lyrisme romantique, James Rolfe (né en 1961) joue à la fois avec le passé et un présent plutôt disloqué, Gary Kulesha (né en 1954) se veut plus sombre et passionné.

Quant à Ray Luedeke (né en 1944), dont l’œuvre Fancies and Interludes VI donne son titre à l’album, il a composé son long duo tout spécialement pour Jacques Israelievitch et, comme lui, ne croit de toute évidence pas à la modération. C’est tout un voyage au cœur des deux instruments qu’il propose à l’auditeur! Le violon y est exploré sous toutes ses coutures, parfois lyrique et parfois obstiné, parfois voluptueux et parfois râpeux, parfois intime et parfois théâtral, et semble se jouer du caractère si différent du piano percussif qui lui tourne autour sans cesse. Fascinant à découvrir!

Depuis longtemps déjà, ces deux brillants musiciens ont à cœur de faire rayonner la musique canadienne, que ce soit ensemble ou chacun de leur côté, en concert ou sur disque. Cette nouvelle parution vient s’ajouter à un riche parcours en ce sens. Souhaitons-leur de ne jamais perdre le goût de l’aventure!


Read Review Online : http://www.icimusique.ca/#!ecoute-integrale/israelievitch-quilico